De Ilios y otras cosas

archiemcphee:

British-born, Italy-based sculptor Matthew Simmonds is an art-historian-turned-stone-carver who sculpts beautiful architectural interiors inside rough pieces of marble and stone. His pieces look like miniature classical monuments and temples, empty of people, but full of intricate details.

“To create a sculpture that catches the light and structure of a building and lets the eye wander, to feel that here my eye could live, here a part of me could stay, is a great achievement,“ writes Simmonds. “The sculptures give the viewer a different perspective on space. They look different from every viewpoint. You long to be in them, and they seem almost more meaningful for that.“

To view more of Matthew Simmonds’ intricate sculptures click here.

[via Colossal]

(via klaatu)

asylum-art:

The Cave Art Paintings of the Lascaux Cave

Lascaux is famous for its Palaeolithic cave paintings, found in a complex of caves in the Dordogne region of southwestern France, because of their exceptional quality, size, sophistication and antiquity. Estimated to be up to 20,000 years old, the paintings consist primarily of large animals, once native to the region. Lascaux is located in the Vézère Valley where many other decorated caves have been found since the beginning of the 20th century. Lascaux is a complex cave with several areas (Hall of the Bulls, Passage gallery) It was discovered on 12 September 1940 and given statutory historic monument protection in december of the same year. In 1979, several decorated caves of the Vézère Valley - including the Lascaux cave - were added to the UNESCO World Heritage Sites list. But these hauntingly beautiful prehistoric cave paintings are in peril. Recently, in Paris, over 200 archaeologists, anthropologists and other scientists gathered for an unprecedented symposium to discuss the plight of the priceless treasures of Lascaux, and to find a solution to preserve them for the future.

(via thedeerandtheoak)